Working with Mortons Neuroma


intermetatarsal neuromaA neuroma is an often painful enlargement of one of your body?s nerves. Morton?s neuroma is the name used to describe nerve enlargement in your foot, particularly enlargement of one of the nerves traveling to your toes in your forefoot. Morton?s neuromas most commonly develop in one of your intermetatarsal nerves, one of many nerve branches within your foot that originated in your spine. Morton?s neuroma is more likely to affect women than men.


Experts are not sure what exactly causes Morton's neuroma. It seems to develop as a result of irritation, pressure or injury to one of the digital nerves that lead to the toes, which triggers a body response, resulting in thickened nerve tissue (neuroma). Feet conditions/situations that can cause the bones to rub against a nerve include high-heeled shoes, especially those over 2 inches (5cm), or a pointed or tight toe box which squash the toes together. This is probably why the condition is much more common in females than in males. High-arched foot, people whose feet have high arches are much more likely to suffer from Morton's neuroma than others. Flat feet, the arch of the foot collapses. The entire sole of the foot comes into complete or near-complete contact with the ground. A bunion, a localized painful swelling at the base of the big toe, which enlarges the joint. Hammer toe, a deformity of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the second, third, or fourth toe causing it to be permanently bent. Some high-impact sporting activities including running, karate, and court sports. Any sport that places undue pressure on the feet. Injuries, an injury or other type of trauma to the foot may lead to a neuroma.


Neuroma patients occasionally complain of a ?pins and needles? sensation that spreads through their feet, or of a feeling akin to hitting their ?funny bone.? The sensation may be described as similar to an electric shock. Some patients also say that these symptoms, as well as those listed above, will come and go, depending on what they are wearing on their feet, the activity they are doing, or on other external factors.


During the exam, your doctor will press on your foot to feel for a mass or tender spot. There may also be a feeling of "clicking" between the bones of your foot. Some imaging tests are more useful than others in the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. Your doctor is likely to order X-rays of your foot, to rule out other causes of your pain such as a stress fracture. Ultrasound. This technology uses sound waves to create real-time images of internal structures. Ultrasound is particularly good at revealing soft tissue abnormalities, such as neuromas. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using radio waves and a strong magnetic field, an MRI also is good at visualizing soft tissues. But it's an expensive test and often indicates neuromas in people who have no symptoms.

Non Surgical Treatment

Conservative treatment for Morton?s neuroma involves footwear that allows your forefoot to spread. High-heeled shoes cause neuromas by squeezing and stretching your involved intermetatarsal nerve across the ball of your foot and should be avoided as often as possible. A shoe that possesses any toe spring will also place more stress on your foot nerves and increase your likelihood of developing a neuroma. Test shoes before you buy them to see if they are appropriate for your feet. Select shoes that have a removable liner or insole, and stand on the liner, noting the position of your foot. If your foot is wider than your liner, that shoe will irritate your neuroma by squeezing your metatarsal bones together.interdigital neuroma

Surgical Treatment

If your pain continues despite several months of conservative treatment, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the neuroma or to widen the space through which the affected nerve travels. These types of surgery often are done under local anesthesia. If your doctor removes a portion of the affected nerve along with the neuroma, you may develop permanent numbness between the toes.


While Morton?s Neuroma has been an ongoing topic of clinical investigation, the condition is in some cases difficult to either treat or prevent. Experimental efforts involving the injection of muscle or bone with chemicals such as alcohol, as well as suturing, and covering affected areas with silicone caps have been attempted, with varying success.